facebook twitter pinterest houzz

800.983.0031
Allied Member, ASID
AZ ROC 287314

December 28, 2012

WENDELL CASTLE “Father of the art furniture movement”

Filed under: Uncategorized — jherzlinger @ 8:42 am

One of my favorite things about writing these blogs is that I come across so many talented artists that I love! I have been a big fan of Wendell Castle and the amazing furniture that he creates. I am looking through all of his chairs trying to pick out one for myself but I can’t! There are just way too many amazing pieces to choose from! Even choosing photos for the blog today was a hard decision, so I did my best for pick my some of my top favorites!

Enjoy!

Love,

Jamie

Wendell Castle was born in 1932 in Kansas where he later studied at the University of Kansas. He received a Bachelor’s degree of Fine Arts in industrial design and also a master of fine arts. Castle taught at RIT School for American Craftsment.

Castle’s unique pieces are often organic and sometimes whimsical. They are crafted from rare and beautiful hardwoods, plastics, veneers, and metals in a timeless contemporary style. His expression of color and exotic materials are interchangeable with the Wendell Castle name.
Castle has received numerous awards is his lifetime, including one in 2007 from the Brooklyn Museum of Art/Modernism.

December 20, 2012

SULING WANG-WOW!

Filed under: suling wang — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:09 am

I saw a painting of Suling Wang’s and thought it had wonderful movement-fluid and graceful and it makes you smile-for me it made me feel like I could see the wind.  I hope you enjoy this post and have a fantastic day!L

Love, Jamie


Suling Wang’s large-scale paintings and works on paper are influenced by the changing landscape and rapid industrialization of her native Taiwan and its divergent cultural and artistic traditions. Wang’s compositions

are characterised by sweeping strokes of bold colour that flow in and out of the visual field,

resulting in a dynamic synthesis of painting and drawing. Employing an expansive vocabulary of gestural marks and layers,

the forms are organised and defined on multiple planes allowing the paintings to be read in terms of both time and space. Her fluid and calligraphic forms are suggestive of trees, stems and rock-like structures.


Disparate visual elements such as imaginary mountains and submerged islands all overlap in planes that impart depth and create rhythmic, but occasionally disharmonious, patterns.Ultimately, the works speak of the

idea of a reality that is continually in a state of flux or dissolution.

December 19, 2012

JOHN KORNER-NOT JUST ANOTHER GREAT ARTIST!

Filed under: john korner — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:07 am

Another artist that I havwe recently been introduced to, has a lot of vision in his work and a lot of emotions.  I really enjoyed learning about him and his work!  Have a wonderful day!

Love, Jamie


“PROBLEMS ARE COMPARATIVELY easy to deal with.” This statement welcomes the reader of John Kørner’s 2004 artist book A Modern Problem. But don’t the unresolvedproblems of these modern times really scare us to death? Who doesn’t prefer a world without problems and in fact goes out of their way to avoid a problem?

The artist takes over the role of the presenter of ‘self-inflicted’ problems, reflecting society as “a series of fragmented situations, with every little element, physical or non-physical, seen as an isolated problem.” This is the chance to take nothing for granted

— and take on the initiative, since “a considerable amount of creativity and energy are

Produced by the process of solving these problems… so the creation of problems…

Should be like petrol for new challenges.”

 

Reuniting the concept of direct, informally articulated imagery with the return of the

Painter-philosopher, Kørner’s work turns the abstract plane of the canvas into a colored

Minefield of possibilities, reflecting reality more than attempting to represent it. Every

Color, every figure and every paint stroke, every dot and mark has a name, a particular relevance akin to a word, a sentence or a semicolon in a text. Yet with the

difference that it allows for more complex means of representation and interpretation, while maintaining a simplicity: painting is a problem. This makes it

tricky to describe the work of Kørner. His canvases, with their watered-down acrylics, are straightforward, figurative and recognizable for their intense, clear

colors that at first glance exude emotions between childlike happiness, happy-go-lucky playfulness, zany optimism bordering on the esoteric, if not outright

neurotic. His handling of paint is confident, gutsy, yet varied, controlled, with no fear of simplicity or complex situations. And a whole box of tricks and schemes, that on closer inspection gives the artist the access to a whole new concept of painting and to examine its genuine possibilities against a clearly contemporary background — with a multitude of historical, formalist and painterly references

December 17, 2012

FOLLOWING WITH FANTASTIC INDIAN ARTISTS-RAM KUMAR

Filed under: ram kumar — Tags: — admin @ 2:54 pm

In continuing with my new adoration of Indian Artists, today’s post is on one of the originals. Ram Kumar is said to be one of the first indian artists to give up

figurativism for abstract art.

 Associated with the Progressive Artists Group, Ram Kumar is considered one of India’s foremost

 

 

 

abstract painters.  Kumar was born to a large family in 1924

and studied art after completing his degree in economics.  He moved to Paris and studied under Fernand Leger and Andre Lhote.  He has won critical acclaim

as a painter for his abstract landscapes which are fantastic!

I hope you are enjoying this series! Have a fantastic day!

Love, Jamie

December 14, 2012

AKBAR PADAMSEE-INNOVATIVE INDIAN ARTIST

Filed under: akbar padamsee — Tags: — admin @ 3:22 pm

Well, to know me is to know when I get on a topic that I love I keep going with it!  I really have fallen under the spell if Indian artists and quite interested in

collecting some of them.  Their use of color and the freedom of abstraction, looks so un-forced and so not deliberate as I have seen in so many abstract artists work. 

Akbar Padamsee’s  innovative career as a painter, printmaker, photographer, teacher and theoretician spans six decades.  

He was born in Mumbai in 1928.  Like many post-colonial Indian artists, he emigrated to Paris in 1952 to study Western modernist masters.  

Padamsee considers his work neither abstract nor representational.  Rather, he focuses on nature and the elements in an artistic pursuit of philosphical intent.

His paintings give you this snese of an imediate perceptual experience that cause him to be one of the highest valued Indian aritsts at auction.

 

Enjoy and have a great day!

Love, Jamie

December 12, 2012

CATHERINE OPIE:AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHER

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 3:57 pm

You know my love of photography, and today I want to introduce you to a fantastic photographer.  Catherine Opie has made her name exploring

communal, sexual and cultural identity along with subcultures on the fringes of society through a diversity of genres taking in studio portraiture,

landscape photography and urban street photography. her scenes sometimes right up in front of you and very close, drag queens  and kings,

performance artists and female to male transexuals are portrayed in front of bright backdrops, confronting the viewer and recalling how Hans Holbein

depicted the aristocracy. 

Opie is perhaps best known for her formal color-saturated portraits. These pieces brilliantly use classic portraiture form for contemporary subjects.

Transgender, pierced, scarred, bleeding, cross-dressing subjects confront the viewer with defiant, curious, confident, sometimes plaintive attitudes.

The classic meets the “fringe” and the two marry to create a rare, confrontational beauty.

Some images you may find disturbing but that is the beauty of art and our culture, that we can explore and express.

Have a great day!

Love, Jamie

December 11, 2012

LARRY RIVERS-ONE OF THE ART WORLD’S MOST CONTROVERSIAL ARTISTS-BUT GREAT WORK

Filed under: larry rivers — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 7:52 am

Larry River’s work is very highly sought after and is having a total resurgence in interest.  I saw a couple of his pieces in a couple of museums and became very interested in his work.

I hope you enjoy this post, his work is great, his history re what his children think of him is a bit disturbing.

Larry Rivers is a quintessential New Yorker. Born in the Bronx in 1923, Rivers initially pursued a career as a jazz saxophonist, playing in New York City establishments until 1945 when he began painting.

He attended New York University from 1948 to 1951, studying under William Baziotes. At this time Rivers met Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock and other Abstract Expressionists whose active style of painting

would prove to be River’s first major influence. While River’s oeuvre can be considered abstract for the most part, he also interspersed figurative works throughout his career. Many such works feature playing cards,

French currency, family members and the artist himself.

Few artists of the twentieth century rival River’s versatility and desire to experiment, as evidenced by his ability to work in different genres and with a diverse range of media. In the early 1960’s Rivers worked with

Universal Limited Art Editions to produce a color lithograph titled Last Civil War Veteran, published in 1961, and in 1963 he joined Marlborough Gallery. His irreverent and often humorous handling of politics,

history, and sex in his later works created much controversy and affirmed his position as innovator and artistic pioneer.

Rivers is represented by many museums around the world, including: The Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; The Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; Los

Angeles County Museum of Art, California. In New York he is represented in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Jewish Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,

The Museum of Modern Art, and The Whitney Museum of American Art. In Washington, D.C. he is represented at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, The

Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, and The National Gallery of Art. He is also represented by the Tate Gallery, London, England; the Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City, Mexico; and the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Caracas, Venezeula.

December 7, 2012

VERNE DAWSON-VERY ETHEREAL AND MYSTICAL

Filed under: verne dawson — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:47 am

I saw a painting of Verne Dawson’s recently and really loved the vibe of the painting and his style of painting.  His story behind his thought regarding his subjects is very interesting! I hope you find this as wonderful as I do!

Have a great day!

Love,

Jamie



Verne Dawson investigates the continuities between ancient culture and contemporary life through myths, folktales, and traditions that have vanished or become detached from their origins and meanings.

Dawson is also concerned that we have lost our connection to the natural rhythms that governed our ancestors’ lives. In Pagans, on view in 2010, he explores multiple traditions invented to explain natural phenomena,

particularly those relating to astronomy. On the four sides of the canvas, each season is represented by its corresponding modern-day pagan figure: winter is represented by Santa Claus, spring by the fool,

summer by the Green Man, and fall by death or Dracula. They hold playing cards representing their calendrical significance.

Also represented, among others, are Mother Goose, Little Red Riding Hood, Mary and her lamb

, Jack and his beanstalk, Jack and Jill, the three men in a tub, Old Mother Hubbard’s shoe and her children, and Jason’s ship Argo. At once utopian and apocalyptic, Pagans combines myths and fairytales to argue for the

regenerative qualities of a culture in harmony with nature.

December 5, 2012

STRING THEORY MEETS ART-CONRAD SHAWCRESS!

Filed under: conrad shawcress — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:12 am

I have just been introduced to this amazing artist, Conrad Shawcress.  His work is fabulous, very string theory meets art, and I love it!

I hope you have a wonderful day!

Love,

Jamie


Imbued with an appearance of scientific rationality, Conrad Shawcross’s sculptures explore subjects that lie on the borders of geometry and philosophy, physics andmetaphysics. Attracted by failed quests for knowledge in

the past, he often appropriates redundant theories and methodologies to create ambitious structural and mechanical montages, using a wide variety of materials and media, and working on an epic scale. Different technologies –

nautical and audio-visual – and different natural forces inspire his forms, but his mysterious machines and structures remain enigmatic, filled with paradox and wonder. Some have an absurdist melancholy feel, while others

tend to the sublime.

 

More recently, with another group of works, Conrad Shawcross has begun to experiment with ideal geometries and topologies; these constructions are conceived as systems, sometimes modular, sometimes mechanical,

which could be theoretically extended infinitely into space. In these and other sculptures, Shawcross pays tribute to some of the great pioneers and analysts, and considers a specific moment or figure from the past.

December 3, 2012

NATHAN OLIVEIRA-ANOTHER AMAZING CALIFORNIA ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST!

Filed under: nathan oliveira — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:26 am

You know, when I sit to write these blogs, I consider myself insanely lucky! As I get to write and recall all of the inspirations that so make my world what it is.  In continuing with my love of California abstract Expressionists, I bring to you today Nathan Oliveira. Thank you for letting me share my thoughts with you each day.

(Nathan Oliveira passed away on November 13, 2010.)

For more than 30 years, internationally recognized painter Nathan Oliveira occupied a serene studio nestled in the foothills above Stanford University, where he taught for decades. Spark visited Oliveira where he created some of his most famous works.

Oliveira is well-known as a major painter associated with a group of artists called the Bay Area Figurative School. Taking a cue from the abstract expressionist style that characterized East Coast painting in the postwar period, Oliveira and others used a thick, painterly style,

but used it to represent rough, abstracted figures and landscapes.

Over the last 20 years, Oliveira had intermittently worked on “The Windover,” a series of paintings named for a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins. The canvases, which depict abstract forms recalling wings, were inspired by the red-tailed hawks living in the foothills that surround Oliveira’s studio.

In an effort to keep the series of nearly

20 paintings together as a group, Oliveira had been meeting with Stanford officials to create a quiet space somewhere in the foothills to house “The Windover” and be designed as a peaceful refuge where visitors can go to meditate and collect their thoughts.

Nathan Oliveira earned a B.A. in 1951 and an M.F.A. in 1952 from the California College of Arts and Crafts (now known as the California College of the Arts).

Oliveira received critical recognition early on in his career for emotionally charged paintings that are an attempt, in the artist’s words, to “make a spiritual contribution.”1 His main artistic preoccupation throughout his oeuvre has been the depiction of a solitary figure,

usually female, and often wraithlike, emerging from an atmospheric and

undefined space. In the early 1960s, Oliveira’s palette shifted and he began to incorporate more vibrant colors. His subject matter, however, remained the same. The influence of Northern European expressionism, such as Edvard Munch and Max Beckmann, with whom Oliveira

studied at Mills College, Oakland, in 1950, is evidenced in his work

as is the portraiture of Rembrandt and the attenuated female figurative sculptures of Giacommetti.

Oliveira’s graphic achievements have established him as a major figure in American printmaking. His innovative work in lithography and monotype has been compared to that of Goya, Picasso, Edvard Munch, and Eugène Carrière, and he has created procedural standards

that artists continue to follow today.2 In the 1980s, also Oliveira began

working with sculpture, creating works that draw inspiration from Pre-Columbian iconography to 20th-century modern works, most notably those of Giacommetti.

ENJOY!

LOVE,

JAMIE

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
In accordance with the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, the scanning, uploading, and electronic sharing of any part of this portfolio and its pictures, without the permission of Jamie Herzlinger Interiors constitutes unlawful piracy and theft of the designer's intellectual property. If you would like to use material from the portfolio (other than for review purposes), prior written permission must be obtained by contacting Jamie Herzlinger Interiors at . Thank you for your support of the designer's rights.
© Jamie Herzlinger | Site Map