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October 31, 2013

LEE UFAN-WHO?

Filed under: lee ufan — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 7:21 am

As you all know, I am always interested in the philosophical nature of art, why , the influences, the time period, what is the artist trying to tell us or hoping for us to experience.

Lee fan is such an artist with a lot to say via his art.  My daughters thought it was funny that I would be so interested in “a guy that puts rocks on the floor”! Like what’s up mommy?

But if you enjoy installation art, this is pretty interesting.

Mr. Lee, 75, is an aesthetic distiller. He boils two- and three-dimensional art down to formal and conceptual essences. Sculptures consist of ordinary, pumpkin-size boulders juxtaposed with sheets and slabs of dark, glossy steel.

Paintings made of wide brush strokes executed in gridded order on raw canvas exemplify tension between action and restraint.

A much published philosopher as well as an artist who divides his time between Japan and Paris, Mr. Lee has enjoyed considerable recognition in Europe and in the Far East.

Lee Ufan is acclaimed for an innovative body of work that revolves around the notion of encounter—seeing the bare existence of what is actually before us and focusing on “the world as it is.”

Lee was born in southern Korea in 1936 and witnessed the political convulsions that beset the Korean peninsula from the Japanese occupation to the Korean War, which left the country divided in 1953.

Over the last 40 years, he has lived and worked in Korea, Japan, and France, becoming a transnational artist in a postmodern world before those terms were current. “The dynamics of distance have made me what I am,” he remarks.

In the late 1960s, in an artistic environment emphasizing ideas of system, structure, and process, Lee emerged as the theoretical leader of Mono-ha (literally, “School of Things”), a Japanese movement that arose amid the collapse of colonial world orders,

antiauthoritarian protests, and the rise of critiques of modernity.

Lee’s sculptures, presenting dispersed arrangements of stones together with industrial materials like steel plates, rubber sheets, and glass panes, recast the object as a network of relations based on parity among the viewer, materials, and site.

Over the last 40 years, he has lived and worked in Korea, Japan, and France, becoming a transnational artist in a postmodern world before those terms were current. “The dynamics of distance have made me what I am,” he remarks.

Love,

Jamie

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