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April 27, 2015

DONALD JUDD-WHO? AND YES-MINIMALISM IS ART!

Filed under: Uncategorized — jherzlinger @ 8:27 am

Minimalism is a long topic unto itself.  And many people don’t consider Minimalism to be art.  much like some people think that a work by Pollack, anyone could do by throwing paint on a canvas-now think of Minimalism.  But today’s post, although yes, is about a

Minimalist artist is not about Minimalism.  Rather, i want you to think, in interior design magazines that you have seen lately how objects are in multiples, or of one color, or a certain grouping all of the same item.

Although I am quite positive there is not quite the same theological idea behind it, it is the same result.  Objects, in space, and their relation to that space.  So I thought to bring you art as it relates to interiors.  I am a huge advocate using small accessories,

that they be in multiples, usually of one color.  I too love the result.  the impact conveys a confidence and a simple statement. The first time I saw judd’s work was at the Museum of modern art in NYC.

I am sure you have seen his work or pieces that have been influenced.  now you know who the artist is.

In the 1960s, Donald Judd began to create art that used “real materials in real space.” He created objects that occupied three-dimensional space and rejected illusionism. This style of art was called Minimalism. Judd and other Minimalists sought to create a depersonalized art in

which the physical properties of space, scale, and materials were explored as phenomena of interest on their own, rather than as metaphors for human experience. “A shape, a volume, a color, a surface is something itself,” Judd wrote. “It shouldn’t be concealed as part of a fairly different whole.”

During this time, he created shapes that were geometric in form that stood out from the wall and eventually moved to freestanding works on the floor. In the 1960s, Judd became well known for sleek, boxlike constructions made of industrial materials such as plywood,

sheet metal, and plexiglass that were painted using commercial techniques.He considered himself a painter but not a sculptor.

In the work Untitled Judd challenges the viewer to reconsider the concepts of boredom, monotony, and repetition this piece is considered to be Judd’s trademark. This piece hangs suspended  from the wall. His work is almost mathematically precise but he claims his geometric series

mean nothing to him in terms of mathematics. He is impatient with critics

who claim that his works and those of other Minimal artists have no meaning. He claims he does not attempt to deliver his own political or social messages, but insists his goal is to focus on the space occupied and created by his objects-

-their purity of form. In the work Untitled Judd challenges the viewer to reconsider the concepts of boredom, monotony, and repetition.  Because of the scale of his works, they are not often readily installed in museums or galleries.

Enjoy!

Love,

Jamie

March 18, 2015

RICHARD PETTIBONE-FANTASTIC!

Filed under: Uncategorized — jherzlinger @ 7:27 am

Richard Pettibone’s small construction/paintings of the 1960s — appropriations of work by Warhol, Stella, and Lichtenstein — were a defining aspect of a peculiarly West Coast current of “Conceptual Pop.”

His earliest works were shadow-box assemblages addressing his interest in model making, especially toy trains and airplanes. In the 1960s he found his voice in diminutive “copies” of newly famous New York pop artists.

Always framed and constructed upon miniature stretcher bars, they are usually presented in single-image replication.

By the 1970s, Pettibone was combining and juxtaposing different images, introducing monochrome areas and gestural scribbles into these combinations, and experimenting with the simulation of photo-realist techniques.

The Brancusi sculptures from the 1980s are various sized versions of such iconic works as Bird in Space and Endless Column. In a conflation of modernism and modernist “taste,” the Brancusi simulations are often presented in


combination with his beautifully crafted homages to the pared-down forms of Shaker furniture. Pettibone’s visual punning and aesthetic elegance is evident in his simple juxtaposition of an elegant Shaker table with a minimalist,

industrial I-beam.

In the late 1980s to the present, Pettibone pursued an obsession for the poetry and criticism of modernist Ezra Pound (another great appropriator) and created a group of paintings based upon the original covers of Pound’s publications.


In the 1990s, he engaged the work of Piet Mondrian, whose paintings he both replicated and “reduced” in sculptural constructions. But without doubt, his most insistent andunifying theme has been his ever-expanding colloquy with

two paradoxical giants of 20th-century art, Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol

March 9, 2015

DIANA VREELAND, LEGENDARY EDITOR AT VOGUE AND ORIGINAL STYLEMAKER!

Filed under: diana vreeland,Uncategorized — Tags: , , — jherzlinger @ 7:00 am

So, today’s post is on a fashion icon, that not only was a taste and stylemaker but really set the tone for how we dress, how we view fashion and now interiors!

This post comes about in a wonderfully full circle kind of way! While I have been “working” at the Kips Bay Show House, I have had the pleasure of being asked if “I am the same Jamie Herzlinger that designed women’s fashions”?  Then the conversation at lunch one day was with an ex-editor of a fashion magazine from many years ago, who brought up the subject of my family, actually my mother, Nan Herzlinger, having been a very well known fashion designer, durning the age of Diana Vreeland at the helm of Vogue, Manning, who was one of the most famous fashion illustrators, Bernadine Morris who was legendary at the New York Times and the story continued.  I am writing this today at of a dear fondness for where and how life goes full circle and those of us having come from the fashion industry have such fond memories.

I was raised in such a fashion family, at a time when women’s sportswear coincided with women’s independence.  The 1960′s and 1970′s were paramount for all types of artistic expressions.  Think to the artists of that time, the music, the writer’s and especially the fashion designers!

So this ode is to a sensational ground breaking time, (and actually to my mother as Mother’s day was just this past Sunday), which I had the sincere pleasure of witnessing.  Diana Vreeland I recall with much admiration as I remember her well. Especially the infamous ads for Blackglamma Mink.  She was a legend and I think it is always wonderful to know an industry’s past icons that helped it become what it is today! My Mother was extremely fond of her and Diana’s will and style are very reminiscent of my Mother.

Diana Vreeland was at Bazaar first and became introduced to her readers through her signature epigrammatic style with the “Why Don’t You?” column, which she began writing in august of 1936.  ”Why don’t you…turn your child into an Infanta for a fancy-dress party?” she asked readers.  Her credo was: don’t just be your ordinary dull self.  Why don’t you be ingenious and make yourself into something else?

At Bazaar, Vreeland reinvented the job of fashion editor.  she chose the american Clothes to be featured in the magazine, oversaw the photography and worked with the models.

I hope you enjoy this piece of history, mine too!

Enjoy!

Love,

Jamie

February 9, 2015

ONE OF THEE MOST SUCCESSFUL BLACK AMERICAN AMERICAN ARTISTS OF ALL TIME! KERRY JAMES MARSHALL

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An artist, can’t get much more successful than Kerry James Marshall!  Museums everywhere own his work. (The Corcoran was one of his first buyers. And the Baltimore Museum of

Art is displaying his “Ladder of Success,” a recent purchase.) In 1997, he won the $500,000 MacArthur “genius” award, an ultra-prestigious invitation to Germany’s twice-a-decade

Documenta show and a place in the Whitney Museum’s biennial.

 

 

Success, after success, after success, such as few Black American artists have ever had. And not nearly good enough. Marshall says that he has yet to measure up to certain of his

best-known rivals: “Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael. . . . They represent the core of the historical pantheon of great artists, recognized worldwide. And a big part of my objective

is to be listed in the history among those artists.”

It’s about “a longing to be fully a part of the story of some system you are deeply in love with,” says Marshall

And it’s about the certain knowledge that, in art at least, no black person has ever truly reached that goal.

Until quite recently, Afro American people have barely even been the subjects of pictures.

Marshall has set out to correct that imbalance. Some of his pictures portray the living rooms of the black middle class. There are also paintings of street toughs, dead before their time.

Marshall has painted inner-city housing projects and black lovers by the sea. He’s also worked a bit in installation art, photography, video and even puppetry. But whatever the subject,

or the medium, his works balance celebration and critique of Black America; it’s impossible to come to any simple reading of his pictures’ point of view. Marshall may be today’s most

eloquent artistic chronicler, and most compelling analyst, of the African American experience. His success beyond the black community means that he’s also opened mainstream eyes to it.

February 4, 2015

GENE DAVIS-THE BEST STRIPES!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:02 am

I have always loved stripes-and can never get enough of them.  I use them a lot in my designing of rooms-a subtle stripe can really offset a pattern fabric beautifully.

Anyway-gene davis is a stripe master!

I hope you enjoy this post!

Love,

Jamie

Davis was born in Washington D.C. in 1920, and spent nearly all his life there. Before he began to paint in 1949, he worked as a sportswriter, covering the Washington Redskins and other local teams.

Working as a journalist in the late 1940s, he covered the Roosevelt and Truman presidential administrations, and was often President Truman’s partner for poker games.

Davis’s first solo exhibition of drawings was at the Dupont Theater Gallery in 1952, and his first of paintings was at Catholic University in 1953. A decade later he participated in the “Washington Color Painters”

exhibit at the Washington Gallery of Modern Art, which traveled to other venues around the US, and launched the recognition of the Washington color school as a regional movement in which Davis was a central figure.

The Washington painters were among the most prominent of the mid-century color field painters. Though he worked in a variety of media and styles, including ink, oil, video, acrylic and collage. Davis is best known by

far for his acrylic paintings (mostly on canvas) of colorful vertical stripes, which he began to paint in 1958. The paintings typically repeat particular colors to create a sense of rhythm and repetition with variations.

One of the best-known of his paintings, “Black Grey Beat” (1964), owned by the Smithsonian, reinforces these musical comparisons in its title. The pairs of alternating black and grey stripes are repeated across the canvas,

and recognizable even as other colors are substituted for black and grey, and returned to even as the repetition of dark and light pairs is here and there broken by sharply contrasting colors.

 

Franklin’s Footpath

In 1972 Davis created Franklin’s Footpath, which was at the time the world’s largest artwork, by painting colorful stripes on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Artr, and the world’s largest painting,

Niagara (43,680 square feet), in a parking lot in Lewiston, N.Y. His “micro-paintings”, at the other extreme, were as small as 3/8 of an inch square.

 

January 12, 2015

CECIL BEATON-WHO? ANOTHER ALL TIME GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:07 am

I have always loved cecil Beaton’s work and the iconic images he created.  His portraits have stayed in our minds when we think of the images of certain people.  Much like Madonna’s song that she sings Vogue, all of these characters were Cecil Beaton’s images.

Photography, and what I am hoping to show you, is as important a medium as a pint brush and a canvas.  A lens in the hands of an artist is so stunning. Have you ever taken a bad picture? or heard the expression that the camera loves a certain person?

I love the medium, and I hope you enjoy this art form.

The man described by his on-off friend Truman Capote as a “total self-creation”, he knew that the business of being Cecil was no laughing matter, but something that needed serious application for the success he had always craved.

And the proof of that success is the influence he has had over so many younger photographers since his death 29 years ago. Mario Testino, who has captured modern society and fashion as variously as Beaton did, speaks for many when he says:

“He marked his period as if he were the only photographer around.”Another of today’s most celebrated fashion photographers, Nick Knight, praises his work “for its grace and elegance. From the touching and funny pictures of his sisters and the delicately

fragile poses of his photographs of society beauties, as if they were made of porcelain, to the memorable wartime images, he was always sensitive and poetic.”

So, what was the essence of Beatonism? He was a born outsider; posh but not quite posh enough – his family’s wealth was based on trade. Well educated – but at Harrow, not Eton. Cambridge, not Oxford. Clever but not intellectual. Good-looking but not quite handsome.

He just failed to make the grade in those things that he considered mattered. Vain – he had his clothes made one size too small to flatter his already slim figure – but never glamorous, despite an international lifestyle that brought him into contact with everyone who “mattered” for more than 50 years.

But he had a burning desire to leap the fence and browse the green fields of aristocratic privilege, still going strong in the Twenties and Thirties. Beaton was what was known at the time as a pansy. With eyes trained on the British upper classes and American plutocrats, his tendencies could have

been a disadvantage, but he capitalised on them by aiming not at the men, but at their wives.

Beaton was a very clever photographer whose early portraits reflected continental art movements in his use of mirrors, torn paper, fragments of classical sculpture and even Cellophane to create a surreal fantasy that would automatically make his sitters look much more interesting

than they usually were. They were as flattered culturally as they were physically, even if they had no idea that the original ideas were taken from the work of Cocteau, Bakst or Dalí.

ENJOY!

LOVE,

JAMIE

December 17, 2014

VIK MUNIZ-THE BEST ARTIST WORKING IN RE-PURPOSED MATERIALS

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 7:33 am

You gotta love an artist that can make art, truly out of anything he sees.  I saw a piece by Vik Muniz and was insanely curious about this artist.  I enjoyed the fact that he could see he way though

what is, into what could be-so an existential view almost.

He incorporates a multiplicity of unlikely materials into this photographic process. Often working in series, Vik has used dirt, diamonds, sugar, string, chocolate syrup and

garbage to create bold, witty and often deceiving images drawn from the pages of photojournalism and art history. His work has been 

 

His work is based on different levels of perception. Primarily, he is a sculptor who documents his work with the photography medium. After the project execution it does not matter

if the objects are destroyed, as long as the idea is captured in the photographs.

An example of how Muniz experiences perception in his work can be seen in his series ‘Equivalents’ (1993) – simulations of cloud formations, made with lumps of cotton, inspired by

Alfred Stieglitz’ cloud studies. In this piece the visitor can see once at a time lumps of cotton, clouds or an image that he sees in these clouds. But he will never see these 3 phenomena at the same time.

Muniz photographs all kind of everyday materials and creates illusionary visualizations. Material he uses are i.e. chocolate, sugar, wire, dirt, confetti, objects, thread or jam.

December 8, 2014

CONCEPTUAL ARTIST BRACO DIMITRIJEVIC-FANTASTIC

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 7:03 am

A friend of mine who owns a gallery is in love with Braco Dimitrijevic’s art and his whole raison d’etre! So, I did some research and found him to be fascinating in his philosophy and reasoning.

I hope you enjoy this post!

Love,

Jamie

 

Braco Dimitrijevic, one of the pioneers of conceptual art, had his first one-man exhibition at the age of 10. In 1963 he made his first conceptual work, The Flag of the World,

in which he replaced a national flag with an alternative sign. It marked the beginning of his artistic interventions into urban landscapes.

Over the past forty years he has exhibited extensively all over the world. 

Dimitrijevic gained an international reputation in the seventies with his Casual passer-by series, in which gigantic photo portraits of anonymous people were displayed

on prominent facades and billboards in European and American cities. The artist also mimicked other ways of glorifying important persons by building monuments to

passers-by and installing memorial plaques in honour of anonymous citizens.

December 1, 2014

SHEPARD FAIREY ROCKS GRAFFITI ART

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 7:07 am

I am in love with the work of Shepard Fairey! His , what is now, iconic political campaign poster for Obama, is one of the most amazing examples of his work.  There is a fabulous movie called, Exit Through The Gift Shop, a must see!  All about graffiti artists, many of whom you will recognize.

Fairey created the “Andre the Giant as a Possee” sticker campaign in 1989, while attending the Rhode Island School of Design(RISD).This later evolved into the “Obey Giant” campaign, which has grown via an international network of collaborators

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

replicating Fairey’s original designs. As with most street artists, the Obey Giant was intended to inspire curiosity and cause the masses to question their relationship with their surroundings.

 

The Obey Giant website says: “The sticker has no meaning but exists only to cause people to react, to contemplate and search for meaning in the sticker.” The website later goes on to contradict this statement however by saying that those who are familiar with the sticker simply find humor and enjoyment from its presence. Those who actually try to look deeper into its meaning only burden themselves and often end up condemning the art as an act of vandalism from an evil, underground cult.

Originally intended to garner fame amongst his classmates and college peers, Fairey states, “At first I was only thinking about the response from my clique of art school and skateboard friends. The fact that a larger segment of the public would not only notice, but also investigate, the unexplained appearance of the stickers was something I had not contemplated. When I started to see reactions and consider the sociological forces at work surrounding the use of public space and the insertion of a very eye-catching but ambiguous image, I began to think there was the potential to create a phenomenon.”

October 15, 2014

AYA TAKANO-AND THE SUPERFLAT MOVEMENT

Filed under: aya takano,Uncategorized — Tags: — jherzlinger @ 8:00 am

When I was in Paris, my favorite gallery visit is always GALLERIE PERROTIN.  This is where I first came across the work of AYA TAKANO. I have always enjoyed anime and was interested in the thoughts behind it.  Sometimes, one could look at it and consider it too much a cartoon,

but for me, I find it inspiring.  The images, the colors and the subjects.

I hope you enjoy this post!

Much love,

Jamie

Perhaps more than any other Kaikai Kiki artist, Takano’s work is the exemplification of Japan’s post-war cultural affluence, and its overwhelmingly diverse, yet aesthetic unification of information.

With inspirations varying from 14th Century Italian religious painting to alien evidence to MTV, Takano’s worlds are shiny and futuristic, yet soft and full of traditional and sensual imagery.  Her drawings and paintings in which lively, female characters float and contort their waiflike bodies, convey a passionate drive toward creation.

In Japan, Takano is prolific as a manga artist, illustrator, and science fiction essayist.  She has several serialized publications, and is regularly featured in subculture articles.  In the art markets of Europe and America, her paintings and drawings are enthusiastically received.

Takano spent her childhood rummaging through her father’s library which consisted of many books on the natural sciences, but also science fiction. Ever present in her work are exotic animals and landforms combined with an urban city to show the juxtaposition between future and fantasy. Takano cited in a documentary made by

the Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin that she was always fascinated by the unusual forms of nature and animal life, and desires to have such shapes represented in her work.

Another early influence for her was manga writer Osamu Tezuka’s science fiction, which had a lasting impact on her dreamy perception of the world. She cites in the book Drop Dead Cute by Joan Vartanian how she really believed everything she read was true till she was nineteen. Takano states even sometimes now she imagines possessing

the ability to fly, uninterested in the constrictions of being grounded.

When it was time for her to start thinking about college Takano told her parents she wouldn’t attend unless she was allowed to enter an art program. She received a B.A. from Tama Art University  in Tokyo in 2000. Soon after she became an assistant for leading Japanese Contemporary Artist Takashi Murakami. He would become

Takano’s first mentor and jump start her career.

Murakami was looking to exhibit the work of young artists and wanted to help create an artistic community for like minded artists who did the Superflat style. The Superflat movement, popularized by Murakami himself is about emphasizing the two dimensionality of figures, which is influenced by Japanses manga and anime,

while dually exposing the fetishes of Japanese consumerism. Through the basic ideas of this movement he created the Kaikai Kiki Co., a group where five out of the seven members are women.

In the 1980s the look of pre-pubescent girls became the target of consumer culture in Japanese society. This infantilization and objectification of the female was seen most heavily in Japan’s otaku, or geek culture.

Japanese female artists like Takano seek to reinvent the otaku culture through a feminine perspective. Takano in particular is interested in depicting how the future will impact the role of the female heroine in society. Her figures, often androgynous float through her alternate realities partially clothed or sometimes fully nude. Yet,

Takano denies that she is trying to reveal anything specific about sex. Rather with the slim bodies, bulbous heads, and large eyes she is trying to emphasize that her figures temporary suspension from adulthood. The red paint in the crevices of the figures’ elbows, knees, and shoulders is supposed to convey that they are still engaged in

the growing process mentally and physically. Takano’s playful and ambiguous visions of the future, especially one which revolves around the feminine serves as a way for her to create her own mythology, free from the chains of reality.

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